My Vision

Oakwood is the prefix for dogs bred and lovingly raised in my home. I breed very selectively

implementing a thoroughly researched multigenerational plan to produce dogs of superior

quality, health and temperament.   My priority as a breeder is to produce a few fantastic litters

each year.

 

Conformation

Oakwood dogs achieve their championships typically by winning at the biggest events of the year - the GP Nationals and Breed Supported Entry competitions.  The Oakwood track record for these big wins dates back to 2004.  In 2018~Cami wins the national, Chance is Winners/Dog/Best of Winners and Best puppy in Sweeps, Kerin is Winners Bitch and BOS to Best in Sweeps, Gabi is Select Bitch, Madonna is Best Brood Bitch.  At the shows accompanying the national, Cami was BOS one day, Madonna AOM, Gabi SB twice, Chance and Kerin were both winners 2 of 3 shows.  2017~Georgio Winners Dog at the national and 2 more days that weekend, Merlot Winners Bitch to finish at the Supported Entry,  Madonna Best Foreign Bred at the national,  in 2016~ Cami BOS to Best in Sweeps and major win Nationals weekend, Nikki BOS Nationals Weekend,  2015 ~ Nikki wins BOS Saturday and BOB Sunday of Nationals weekend,  2014 ~ Nikki WB and major and Madonna Owner/Handled BOB,  2013 ~ Madonna placed all three days (select Bitch twice and BOS), 2012 ~ Lukas National BOB, in 2011 we did not attend the national, 2010 ~ Leia WB for a major,  2009 Amigo swept Winners Dog all three days and Rain was WB for a major, 2008 Nick Winners Dog at the national and Amigo, Pete and Diane also won majors, 2007 Lukas and Venture were Winners Dog and Winners Bitch, in 2006 I was show chair and did not show, in 2005 my foundation stud dogs Cash and Kaiser were Winners and in 2004 Sophie was WB for a major, I did not attend the club’s first National Specialty held in 2003.     I have high expectations for the quality of the dogs I show and I realize that in this rare breed, any dog can finish by entering old dogs, pet quality dogs and entire litters of  puppies to ensure a win.  Some breeders foolishly consider a championship the substandard dog’s ticket into their breeding program and the end result can negatively impact the breed.  That is not what I consider reputable breeding, so any dog that does not meet my standards for temperament or quality is placed, even when they already have major wins to their records.   I prefer to strive for excellence. 

Breeding Philosophy

The AKC does not provide any rules or guidelines on inbreeding and linebreeding and breeders in the US can do any breeding combination they choose and register the puppies.  The institute of Canine Biology found “deleterious effects” at an Inbreeding Coefficient (COI) of 5% and by 10% higher mortality, smaller litters and the expression of genetic defects becomes statistically likely.  In breeds like the German Pinscher that was saved from extinction using just 5 individual dogs in the 1950’s the entire worldwide population is highly related to begin with.  Inbreeding (father/daughter, mother/son, sibling to sibling, half-brother to half-sister) and linebreeding (grandfather to granddaughter or first cousins) in this breed can bring genetic health and temperament problems which could be prevented by wiser breeding decisions.  The Kennel Club of England recommends a COI below 4.9% for German Pinschers.  The Institute of Canine Biology recommends a COI under 3% but no more than 6%.  I invest in the long term prosperity of the breed by factoring COI into my breeding decisions.  I travel to the best studs in the world, regardless of their location or import semen from them.  I strive to find the best males worldwide with genetic diversity, excellent health, temperament and superior conformation as my primary goals. The importance of Temperament - FIRST and FOREMOST Temperament is, in my experience, highly inherited in German Pinschers and therefore I am focused on selecting dogs to breed that are of confident, friendly, biddable and stable temperament.  A dog with an amenable personality makes both a wonderful life-long companion as well easy and fun competitors who are wonderful ambassadors for the breed in the show community.    I do not keep my dogs in kennels, outbuildings or runs, my dogs are house dogs and are first and foremost companions.  I expect my dogs live peacefully together and be open and friendly with visitors and at shows.  The importance of Health - CRITICAL to maintain The German Pinscher is, in comparison to other breeds, relatively free of inherited diseases. To ensure breeding with dogs least likely to produce inherited genetic disorders, all my dogs have tested clear by DNA of vonWillebrands Disease (a bleeding disorder) so no futher testing is required unless I choose to breed to a carrier in future.  I have preliminary hip x-rays done when dogs are young and then repeat them after the age of two for their OFA certification to ensuring there is no evidence of Hip / Elbow Dysplasia.  OFA Good or Excellent results are preferred.  An echocardiogram to rule out hereditary heart conditions are done with a certified cardiologist.  The dogs have yearly eye exams with a certified veterinary opthamologists and any dog who fails to receieve a passing exam in any area is removed from the breeding program.  Any dog who has who has produced an offspring with cataracts is also retired from additional breeding.  Cataracts have been more prevalent in the German Pinscher than in other breeds, and progress is being made with reductions seen in cataract percentages over the past 15 years.   German Pinschers can carry the dilute gene (which produces the blue and fawn colors) which along with the color mutation carries with it various health problems.  For this reason I do not breed dilute colors.   Health testing is listed for each dog on their webpage, even if an exam is failed.  Transparency is vital.  Buyers need to know they are getting a dog from a breeder with 15+ years of health data across multiple generations of health tested dogs whose testing is publically disclosed.  Some breeders use dogs known to produce health issues in their offspring.  Buyer beware breed as not all breeders are truthful about what their lines have produced.  I do not over-vaccinate.  AVMA has acknowledged that, just like humans, animals remain at full immunity once properly vaccinated with a series of shots during the first year of life. This means that yearly booster shots, which can cause serious illness to a fully immunized adult dog, are unnecessary and potentially harmful. Only rabies, which is required by law, is routinely given to my adult dogs. I feed a combination of raw human grade meats along with Honest Kitchen dehydrated organic dog food.  The Responsibility of a Breeder I love my dogs with a deep passion and have a tremendous commitment to ensuring each one has the best life possible. While it breaks my heart each time I place a beloved adult who has retired from both the show ring and from my breeding program, I believe I am doing the right thing for the dogs. They deserve the best life.  Dogs should not be kept in kennels isolated from the love and attention they deserve. I find wonderful forever homes for each dog where they can be the center of their new owners universe. My heartache at placing them turns into joy as I get photos of my beloved dogs in front of Christmas trees with their presents, on boats, hiking with their doggy backpacks, just lounging on the couch or dedicating their lives to being service dogs,  I know I've done the right thing when I see how loved my retirees are in their new homes.  In order to continue to home raise and properly socialize and train my next generation to be wonderful ambassadors of their breeds, I limit myself to keeping at most 6 adult dogs. The testimonials I receive from the new owners are so rewarding that it makes me sure that I am doing the right thing for my best friends.                        
© Oakwood German Pinschers - updated September 2018
My Vision

Oakwood is the prefix for dogs bred and lovingly raised in my

home. I breed very selectively implementing a thoroughly

researched multigenerational plan to produce dogs of

superior quality, health and temperament.   My priority as a

breeder is to produce a few fantastic litters each year.

 

Conformation

Oakwood dogs achieve their championships typically by winning at the biggest events of the year - the GP Nationals and Breed Supported Entry competitions.  The Oakwood track record for these big wins dates back to 2004.  In 2018~Cami wins the national, Chance is Winners/Dog/Best of Winners and Best puppy in Sweeps, Kerin is Winners Bitch and BOS to Best in Sweeps, Gabi is Select Bitch, Madonna is Best Brood Bitch.  At the shows accompanying the national, Cami was BOS one day, Madonna AOM, Gabi SB twice, Chance and Kerin were both winners 2 of 3 shows.  2017~Georgio Winners Dog at the national and 2 more days that weekend, Merlot Winners Bitch to finish at the Supported Entry,  Madonna Best Foreign Bred at the national,  in 2016~ Cami BOS to Best in Sweeps and major win Nationals weekend, Nikki BOS Nationals Weekend,  2015 ~ Nikki wins BOS Saturday and BOB Sunday of Nationals weekend,  2014 ~ Nikki WB and major and Madonna Owner/Handled BOB,  2013 ~ Madonna placed all three days (select Bitch twice and BOS), 2012 ~ Lukas National BOB, in 2011 we did not attend the national, 2010 ~ Leia WB for a major,  2009 Amigo swept Winners Dog all three days and Rain was WB for a major, 2008 Nick Winners Dog at the national and Amigo, Pete and Diane also won majors, 2007 Lukas and Venture were Winners Dog and Winners Bitch, in 2006 I was show chair and did not show, in 2005 my foundation stud dogs Cash and Kaiser were Winners and in 2004 Sophie was WB for a major, I did not attend the club’s first National Specialty held in 2003.     I have high expectations for the quality of the dogs I show and I realize that in this rare breed, any dog can finish by entering old dogs, pet quality dogs and entire litters of  puppies to ensure a win.  Some breeders foolishly consider a championship the substandard dog’s ticket into their breeding program and the end result can negatively impact the breed.  That is not what I consider reputable breeding, so any dog that does not meet my standards for temperament or quality is placed, even when they already have major wins to their records.   I prefer to strive for excellence. 

Breeding Philosophy

The AKC does not provide any rules or guidelines on inbreeding and linebreeding and breeders in the US can do any breeding combination they choose and register the puppies.  The institute of Canine Biology found “deleterious effects” at an Inbreeding Coefficient (COI) of 5% and by 10% higher mortality, smaller litters and the expression of genetic defects becomes statistically likely.  In breeds like the German Pinscher that was saved from extinction using just 5 individual dogs in the 1950’s the entire worldwide population is highly related to begin with.  Inbreeding (father/daughter, mother/son, sibling to sibling, half-brother to half-sister) and linebreeding (grandfather to granddaughter or first cousins) in this breed can bring genetic health and temperament problems which could be prevented by wiser breeding decisions.  The Kennel Club of England recommends a COI below 4.9% for German Pinschers.  The Institute of Canine Biology recommends a COI under 3% but no more than 6%.  I invest in the long term prosperity of the breed by factoring COI into my breeding decisions.  I travel to the best studs in the world, regardless of their location or import semen from them.  I strive to find the best males worldwide with genetic diversity, excellent health, temperament and superior conformation as my primary goals. The importance of Temperament - FIRST and FOREMOST Temperament is, in my experience, highly inherited in German Pinschers and therefore I am focused on selecting dogs to breed that are of confident, friendly, biddable and stable temperament.  A dog with an amenable personality makes both a wonderful life-long companion as well easy and fun competitors who are wonderful ambassadors for the breed in the show community.    I do not keep my dogs in kennels, outbuildings or runs, my dogs are house dogs and are first and foremost companions.  I expect my dogs live peacefully together and be open and friendly with visitors and at shows.  The importance of Health - CRITICAL to maintain The German Pinscher is, in comparison to other breeds, relatively free of inherited diseases. To ensure breeding with dogs least likely to produce inherited genetic disorders, all my dogs have tested clear by DNA of vonWillebrands Disease (a bleeding disorder) so no futher testing is required unless I choose to breed to a carrier in future.  I have preliminary hip x- rays done when dogs are young and then repeat them after the age of two for their OFA certification to ensuring there is no evidence of Hip / Elbow Dysplasia.  OFA Good or Excellent results are preferred.  An echocardiogram to rule out hereditary heart conditions are done with a certified cardiologist.  The dogs have yearly eye exams with a certified veterinary opthamologists and any dog who fails to receieve a passing exam in any area is removed from the breeding program.  Any dog who has who has produced an offspring with cataracts is also retired from additional breeding.  Cataracts have been more prevalent in the German Pinscher than in other breeds, and progress is being made with reductions seen in cataract percentages over the past 15 years.   German Pinschers can carry the dilute gene (which produces the blue and fawn colors) which along with the color mutation carries with it various health problems.  For this reason I do not breed dilute colors.   Health testing is listed for each dog on their webpage, even if an exam is failed.  Transparency is vital.  Buyers need to know they are getting a dog from a breeder with 15+ years of health data across multiple generations of health tested dogs whose testing is publically disclosed.  Some breeders use dogs known to produce health issues in their offspring.  Buyer beware breed as not all breeders are truthful about what their lines have produced.  I do not over-vaccinate.  AVMA has acknowledged that, just like humans, animals remain at full immunity once properly vaccinated with a series of shots during the first year of life. This means that yearly booster shots, which can cause serious illness to a fully immunized adult dog, are unnecessary and potentially harmful. Only rabies, which is required by law, is routinely given to my adult dogs. I feed a combination of raw human grade meats along with Honest Kitchen dehydrated organic dog food.  The Responsibility of a Breeder I love my dogs with a deep passion and have a tremendous commitment to ensuring each one has the best life possible. While it breaks my heart each time I place a beloved adult who has retired from both the show ring and from my breeding program, I believe I am doing the right thing for the dogs. They deserve the best life.  Dogs should not be kept in kennels isolated from the love and attention they deserve. I find wonderful forever homes for each dog where they can be the center of their new owners universe. My heartache at placing them turns into joy as I get photos of my beloved dogs in front of Christmas trees with their presents, on boats, hiking with their doggy backpacks, just lounging on the couch or dedicating their lives to being service dogs,  I know I've done the right thing when I see how loved my retirees are in their new homes.  In order to continue to home raise and properly socialize and train my next generation to be wonderful ambassadors of their breeds, I limit myself to keeping at most 6 adult dogs. The testimonials I receive from the new owners are so rewarding that it makes me sure that I am doing the right thing for my best friends.